I, like many who like to take photographs, am addicted to Flickr. I love it. I want it near me always. I want to bask in the billions of amazing photographs and in the short, segmented dialogue offered by a “Post a Comment” field. I love being able to look through groups so I can find a specific kind of image, I love being able to wade through hundreds of photographs at the slide of my thumb without any end!

Sadly a lot of that is missing in the Flickr app for the iPhone. You can access a meager three of the many different components of the actual Flickr webpage, and while this may be a ploy to get us to our desktop for the regular Flickr webpage, it may also limit the more serious Flickr user from components he or she could use on the webpage.

iPhone Flickr App > Recent Activity screen

On the webpage we find the ability to upload images. The app also has this functionality. The Flickr webpage allows you to browse images, groups, images by groups, and to add your photos to sets and collections of your own, view Favorited images and Gallery images, and gives you the ability to submit your images to groups. The Flickr app lets you view Favorited images, your own and your contacts’ photostream and sets, but lacks the Gallery images, collections, and group submissions.

This app delivers but is similar to having a fully functioning body when you’re at home, and having a less functioning body when you’re out and about. It simply is lacking some components that may easily be overlooked by the less anal consumer, but that have been noticed in my observation. I love Flickr, I love the iPhone, but I also love robustness and the Flickr app is not exactly a specimen of robust iPhone app development.

Although you may expect a really low rating given my post, I believe I’ve given the app a decent grade in that I simply docked .8 for lack of robust features that would appeal greatly to Flickr’s user-base, and I’ve kept the rating above 4 because the app does deliver with the features it does have.

App Reviews: Flickr – 4.2/5
Website

Adobe Photoshop steps in again to help you get that cross-processed look on your images and photographs. Simply put, what you want to achieve, is what traditional dark-room techniques achieve when slide film chemicals are used to process print film, and vice versa. Check out this wiki link to learn more on that.

Straight out of the camera (left), cross-processed using tutorial (right)

Before and After

What I found works best I actually came upon on a Flickr tutorial. A quick google search for “getting that cross-processed effect” lead me through several links and eventually Flickr was where I hit the jack pot. It was titled “Vintage Film effect,” but I’ve heard some people refer to cross-processed images that way because it does look somewhat like old film. I will sum up what I think about the steps found in the tutorial, but click here to download the PDF that I found on Flickr. Also, be sure to check out the Photoshop Action so kindly included for us on the Flickr tutorial page.

First off, this tutorial is brilliant. By using adjustment layers in the tutorial, the instruction is simultaneously transforming your photograph while teaching you the power of adjustment layers. Now the experienced Photoshoper has known that adjustment layers are terrific for a long time, it’s a banal detail, but to all who don’t be certain to take in and really sop up the info the tutorial has to offer.

Next the tutorial spirals you through the intimidating world that is the Curves interface. Within this panel you can stretch and compress tones at will, selectively by colour channel, or with all colour channels selected, as well as do many, many other things. I could go on about what those other things are, but instead I’ll recommend that you visit this link on Curves to learn more on that. At any rate, I like the integration of this Curves step because it gives less experienced Photoshopers a chance to learn something new.

The rest of the tutorial involves setting a low opacity layer of solid magenta over your other layers, and flattening the image; a simple step, and just as such, it is simply effective. Playing with the opacity of the final Magenta color cast layer may be something to look at. I’ve set the procedure up into three actions: labeled Hi, Med, Lo, which finish with 22%, 17%, and 9% opacity, respectively, on the Magenta color cast layer. It works. you’ll flatten your image and you’ll love it.

I encourage you to post your results!